The Sky is Changing

By Zoe Jenny

Format: Multiple Formats

London: A group of thirty-somethings meet to celebrate a birthday. But, after two years of trying, Claire and Anthony have still not conceived a child, and pulsing with the fear of terrorist attacks, the city is crackling with tension. Befriending a young girl, Nora, Claire finds herself drawn as her maternal instincts begin to blur.

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Legend Press

Legend Press in an independent publishing company set-up in 2005 by then 25-year-old Tom Chalmers and has been shortlisted for numerous awards. Backed by an international sales, licensing and acquisitions network, it now publishes around 30 titles per year focused on literary, women's, historical and crime fiction.

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London: A group of thirty-somethings meet to celebrate a birthday. All seems normal. But, after two years of trying, Claire and Anthony have still not conceived a child, and pulsing with the fear of terrorist attacks, the city is crackling with tension. Befriending a young girl, Nora, Claire finds herself drawn as her maternal instincts begin to blur. Meanwhile, Anthony is forced to question his job as a City Analyst as their safe and secure existence begins to fracture. As Claire retraces the journey she has made since an accident ended her promising career as a ballet dancer in Berlin, she realises her life has moved beyond her control.

Additional Information

Additional Information

Format Multiple Formats
Imprint Legend Press
Publication Date 29 May 2010
SKU 9781906558178-grouped
Number of Pages 160

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Press Reviews

A compelling, edgily atmospheric portrait of an uneasy city and a young woman's struggle to find her place in the world. With quiet understated assurance, The Sky is Changing asks big questions about our fragmented society. C. J. Schuler, The Independent Not so much a narrative as a state of mind in extremis... At times reminiscent of both Plath and Hemingway. Sunday Times

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